hi-tech denim

Hi-Tech Denim Can Make Your Jeans Even More Comfortable

Hi-tech denim sounds like a paradox. Jeans and other products made with denim fabric are low-tech by nature. When you’re heading out for a casual afternoon or a simple day at the office, they’re an easy go-to. You slip them on because they’re durable, dependable, and super simple to wear. Funny enough, it’s these tried-and-true, low-tech qualities that made designers choose jeans to be the next fashion piece taken over by athleisure aesthetics. That’s right. Hi-tech doesn’t mean elevating all your jeans to designer status. It simply means you’re about to see what new synthetic fabrics can add to your classic denim outfit. Prioritizing function over fashion like most athleisure styles do, this new hi-tech denim could end up the most comfortable pair of trousers you’ve ever worn in your life.


denim
Image by Abclocal 

A DURABLE HISTORY

Denim was invented as a sturdy alternative to lesser fabrics in the West. Jeans were working trousers, sturdy and durable no matter how long you kneeled on your knees working in the heat. From these humble beginnings, denim slowly climbed the fashion ladder and worked its way into popular culture and high-end design. Today, it replaces slacks in many an office. High-end companies feature designer jeans in their collections. Denim appears in skirts, jackets, shorts, and even some unusually shoes. It seems only fitting that the next step in development for these famous everyday clothes would be to integrate them into the athleisure trend sweeping the fashion world. With new temperature- and energy-focused synthetic materials, your jeans are about to take on a new, sporty-chic vibe. Contemporary trends like skinny jeans and denim jackets are in for an impressive improvement.


hi-tech denim
Image by Shopify

THE BENEFITS OF ATHLEISURE

As denim became more of a cultural phenomenon, some designers lost sight of the fabrics original purpose. It was meant to be a comfortable, durable option for the working man and anyone else who needed trustworthy trousers to wear. When denim clothes, especially jeans, began to appear on runways and in semi-formal offices through the 80s and 90s, fashion began to encroach on its functionality. Suddenly, jeans came in unnaturally tight and cumbersomely loose extremes. Thankfully, loose jeans are slowly disappearing from stores at all levels of fashion, but the skinny jean stuck. Athleisure will make these new changes to denim style more manageable using the latest in elastic, tech-savvy fabric. Hi-tech denim won’t do away with current trends in pants and jean jackets but build these styles so they are more comfortable and efficient for you. Finally, function can win over fashion again.


jeans
Image by Express

RE-INVENTING YOUR JEANS

Reworked, hi-tech denim takes time to develop. Since texture and quality are two of the defining qualities of denim, it’s essential that any new product imitates these elements somehow. Since tech-infused fabrics are manmade, it possible to create hi-tech denim that is nearly identical to regular denim in look and feel. It just takes time. Brands are taking the time they need too. Based on recent releases like Nordstrom’s denim trousers covered in faux mud and Topshop’s transparent plastic jeans, people are still very enthusiastic about unconventional denim designs. Reading this as proof the fashion staple is going to stay at the top of its game, designers are teasing their new hi-tech denim fabric rather than rushing through an incomplete product. Whenever these new jeans hit the market, they’re going to be as good as advertised.

Hi-tech denim marks the next phase in jean fashion. It’s a return to the original concept, trousers built to last through hard work and harsh wear and tear. These new jeans will carry that concept into the 21st-century incorporating temperature monitoring and energy efficiency into America’s favorite style of trousers. You can buy jeans pre-muddied, but nothing beats the experience of a relaxing day in flexible, comfortable pants.


  

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